Following Christ to Serve Those in Need

We are uniquely and wonderfully made in the image of our loving God! We are called into relationship that our lives may be more perfectly transformed by the life of Christ, our Savior. In the parable of the beggar Lazarus and the rich man, Jesus is leading us in the way of God’s love toward those in need. In God’s love for us, Christ gave himself as the undeserved favor for those in need, to grant that which is outside of our power: life, salvation, grace, and mercy. We are called to follow in the way of Christ, in love and consideration of others, from the bounty of God’s blessing and endless resource.

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Jesus Loves Me This I Know

In 1962, Someone asked Karl Barth, one of the most notable theologians of the 20th century, how he would summarize the major themes throughout his publishing career. He responded, “Jesus loves me this I know, for the Bible tells me so.” These words from the popular children’s song of the same name communicate some of the most important things that we need to know about who God is and who we are. In this sermon, we will explore the themes of this song more deeply as we also consider two of Jesus’ parables, one about a lost sheep and another about a lost coin.

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Ten Years of Ministry in Middleburg!

Two important symbolic actions were taken as the foundation of our church building was poured. A copy of the Bible was placed in the foundation, and two verses were written in the slab that would support this structure: Deuteronomy 32:47 and Hebrews 4:12. The Word of God is literally the foundation of this church! But we are not just called to remember the word of God, the word of God calls us to action. Jesus tells us that we are to be salt and light to this world. What does that mean? Listen to find out.

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Built to Last

It has often been said that hindsight is 20/20. King Solomon wrote the book of Ecclesiastes at the end of his life, looking back and reflecting on all that he had done. He was a man with no lack of resources and he wholeheartedly pursued whatever caught his attention and interest. Overall, however, he found that most of these pursuits were nothing but “vanity and chasing after the wind.” What is our life is worth pursuing? Where can we find happiness and fulfillment? Ultimately there is only one thing that can bear this weight.

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Storming Heaven

Abraham petitioned the Lord over and over again for the innocent. He relented only after asking the God of the heavens and earth for each of the people. Abraham shows us a way to pray, petitioning God for the concerns of our heart. When people suffer, make bad choices, need help, and experience scary circumstances we need to storm heaven for them. Not assuming that we know the right answer for their life but rather asking God to care for them, provide for them, and have his way in their life. God’s vision is so much clearer and wider than ours. We see life in a limited manner however God can see it all.

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Loving your Neighbor

We can see needs around us all the time. How often do we stop to help? There are lots of reason we might give for not helping, and some of them are probably good ones. But if we always pass by without helping, it may be evidence of a heart problem.

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Laboring in the Harvest

Our vision at Good Samaritan is to help people find God, love God, and share God. But how do we go about sharing God with others? In the Gospel of Luke, Jesus sends out 72 of his disciples into the towns where he himself was about to Go. As he sends them, he gives them some helpful advice which continues to be very applicable today as we share our faith with friends, family, neighbors, and co-workers.

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Preserving the Faith, Engaging the Mission

A lot has happened in the Anglican Communion over the past sixteen years. Structures are shifting, but the faith has not changed, God is still good, and his Kingdom is still expanding. When Elijah was at his darkest moment, God reminded him that he was not alone, and that there were still 7,000 people who had remained faithful. In our dark moments God continues to do the same, he reminds us that we are not alone and that there will always be a faithful remnant ready to continue the work of the mission of God.

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The Second Sunday After Pentecost

Sometimes asking someone, “Who do you say that I am?” can be a rather risky chance. Someone might say something hurtful or unkind. Someone might answer in a way that makes you uncomfortable. Someone might say something true that you do not want to be spoken out loud. Asking someone what people think of you opens up all kinds of possibilities. In the 9th chapter of Luke, Jesus is being vulnerable with his disciples and showing them the way to interact in the world.

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Easter: Dashed Hope Becomes Victory

We talk a lot, as Christians, about the cross and how Jesus died for our sins. This is entirely true, and we should talk about it! But Good Friday without Easter is meaningless. The Resurrection is God’s seal of approval of Jesus’ work on the cross. It is proof that Jesus’ death was not in vain. It was, in fact, a victory, not a failure! The resurrection is the means by which Jesus defeats death forever. There is no resurrection without the crucifixion, and the crucifixion is meaningless without the resurrection. The two go hand in hand. This is why Easter is the most important celebration of the Christian year! It is our defining moment. The event that changes everything and makes us who we are.

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